Jul 24, 2024  
2012-2013 Graduate Catalog 
    
2012-2013 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Teacher Leadership for Learning, Ed.S.


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Program Total (33 Credit Hours)


Ed.S. Common Core in Teacher Leadership for Learning (18 Credit Hours)


The focus in the Common Core is for candidates to develop shared leadership expertise by building networks of influence and working across boundaries. Candidates are introduced to and develop an understanding of the foundation of Distributed School Leadership. Through collaborative case study & problem based learning experiences embedded in the context of schools, cohorts of candidates, regardless of concentrations work together to tackle the tough, ambiguous challenges prevalent in today’s P-12 schools. Candidates develop an understanding of and proficiency in a variety of distributed leadership roles and demonstrate their expertise as required in the eight Performance Outcomes.

The Common Core courses are:

Ed.S. Concentration Options (15 Credit Hours)


The focus of the Concentration is to deepen and broaden the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of the candidates in their content. In order to be a mentor, to empower others, and to support and sustain change within schools, graduates must be viewed as strong content leaders by their colleagues. Candidates have five concentration options in the Ed.S. program—Adolescent Education-Language Arts, Adolescent Education- Mathematics, Early Childhood and Elementary Education, Inclusive Education, and Instructional Technology. The description of these options and the courses of study are provided below.

Adolescent Education


Adolescent Education Teaching Fields or Tracks (6 Credit Hours)


Adolescent Education - English/Language Arts (6 Credit Hours)

The Adolescent Education—English/Language Arts concentration is designed for educators who are currently certified to teach English, Language Arts, or a closely related field (for example, reading or communications) at the middle or secondary level and who have previously successfully completed a Master’s degree from a reputable institution of higher learning in graduate-level English, English Education, Language Arts, or a closely related field. Graduates of the program are leaders for learning because they possess the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to serve in a variety of distributed leadership roles in P-12 schools. The concentration is aligned with NCATE and PSC Unit Standard 1, as well as with the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) standards. Consistent with the Bagwell College of Education’s Conceptual Framework—the Collaborative Development of Expertise in Teaching, Learning, and Leadership—graduates of the program are prepared to serve as collaborative experts in the content area of English/Language Arts and to be effective advocates, agents, mentors, and models and to serve in a variety of distributed leadership roles.

Mathematics (6 Credit Hours)

The Adolescent Education - Mathematics concentration is designed for educators who are currently certified to teach mathematics at the middle or secondary level and who have previously successfully completed coursework in graduate level mathematics. Graduates of the program are leaders for learning because they possess the knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to serve in a variety of distributed leadership roles in P-12 schools. The concentration is aligned with NCATE and PSC Unit Standard 1, as well as with the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics standards. Consistent with the Bagwell College of Education’s Conceptual Framework, the Collaborative Development of Expertise in Teaching, Learning and Leadership, graduates of the program are prepared to serve as collaborative experts in the content area of mathematics and to be effective advocates, agents, mentors and models and to serve in a variety of distributed leadership roles.

Early Childhood and Elementary Education (15 Credit Hours)


The Early Childhood & Elementary Education concentration is designed for teachers in Pre-K through fifth grade. This program of study provides the skills necessary for elementary and early childhood education teachers to become active members in a variety of distributed leadership roles at the elementary school level or district level. Candidates in this concentration develop in-depth knowledge and skills in the areas of curriculum and instruction. Through their ability to synthesize and apply the latest research in curriculum decision making, they demonstrate leadership as change agents for students and education.

The concentration is aligned with NCATE and PSC Unit Standard 1 and is consistent with the Bagwell College of Education conceptual framework. Graduates demonstrate leadership by being models of the profession and experts in teaching and instructional leaders. They demonstrate leadership as mentors to support and guide pre-service teachers to improve teaching and learning for all.

Graduates will be advocates for curriculum improvement while specializing in the art and craft of teaching. Through a thorough theoretical base of curriculum development, understanding of global education issues, and an appreciation for the philosophical inquiry and ethical issues in education, graduates will be leaders for learning. The ECEE teacher-leader will become the change agent of tomorrow’s schools.

Inclusive Education (15 Credit Hours)


The focus of the concentration in Inclusive Education is to prepare teacher leaders who are committed to creating educational environments that ensure that all students, including those with disabilities or those who are culturally and linguistically diverse or both, have equitable opportunities for achieving high academic standards in the state-approved curriculum. The program of study is predicted on the assumption that in successful schools, teachers collectively hold a powerful belief system of high expectations that rejects deficit assumptions about students, their cultures, abilities, and life circumstances. Graduates of Inclusive Education will demonstrate the knowledge, skills and dispositions to serve in a variety of distributed leadership roles within P-12 schools, state and federal government agencies, or private not-for-profit agencies that serve students with disabilities or those who are culturally and linguistically diverse. The program’s courses, designed experiences, and embedded assessments are tightly aligned with eight key performance outcomes which represent the invitational and inclusive nature of distributed leadership as a framework within which formal and informal leaders address and act on complex P-12 issues:

  • Foster an organizational culture that facilitates development of a shared vision, a plan for school improvement, and increased learning for all students;
  • Implement sustainable educational change and process improvement;
  • Create 21st century learning environments that advance best practices in curriculum, instruction, and assessment;
  • Engage in applied research that supports data-driven planning and decision-making for the improvement of schools and learning;
  • Build collaborative relationships, teams, and community partnerships that communicate and reflect distributed leadership for learning;
  • Embrace diversity by demonstrating intercultural literacy and global understanding;
  • Facilitate professional learning and development that enhance and improve professional practice and productivity;
  • Exercise professionalism and ethical practice.

The program emphasized eight essential components of preparation, including: (a) recognition of one’s own ethnocentrism and ideological and philosophical platform; (b) knowledge of students’ cognitive, learning, linguistic, and cultural backgrounds; (c) understanding of the broader social, economic and political context in schools; (d) ability and willingness to use culturally appropriate, positive behavior management strategies; (e) commitment to building differentiated schools and classrooms that are intentionally inviting and inclusive; (f) understanding and use of research-based practices in general education environments; (g) the ability to analyze school-wide, complex problems and resolve issues such that all teachers, students and parents are supported and successful; and (h) and understanding of global issues in education and how they translate into successful educational outcomes for all students.

Instructional Technology (15 Credit Hours)


The focus of the Instructional Technology concentration is to deepen and broaden the knowledge and skills of candidates in this area of study. The Instructional Technology concentration prepares elementary, secondary and middle grades teachers to be leaders in the use of technology for standards-based instruction and assessment. Instructional Technology emerges from the concept of teacher leadership as its primary emphasis is to support the development of teachers in their efforts to use emerging technologies to increase student achievement. The program of study prepares teachers to model best practices in the use of instructional technologies and provides high-quality professional learning experiences for other educators. This course of study is designed to meet the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GAPSC) standards for receipt of a T -6 (Ed.S.) and a T-7 (Ed.D.) certificate.

The concentration is aligned to the Technology Facilitation standards developed by National Council of Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). These standards are designed to help candidates “exhibit knowledge, skills, and dispositions equipping them to teach technology applications; demonstrate effective use of technology to support student learning of content; and provide professional development, mentoring, and basic technical assistance for other teachers who require support in their efforts to apply technology to support student learning” (ISTE/NCATE, 2002).

Candidates address these performance standards in the context of collaborative inquiry with peers and faculty during class discussions and course assignments. Course assignments focus on promoting teacher leadership through the development of high-quality, technology-based curriculum resources and facilitating the effective uses of technology for standards-based instruction and assessment of student learning. Candidates continue their study of distributed leadership and the distinct responsibilities of the eight roles of school leaders as they manifest in the context of supporting an instructional technology program in a school/district. Assignments also build candidates’ understanding of how to lead, design and implement high-quality professional learning for educators and to navigate the change process connected with introducing a technological innovation into a learning environment. Additionally, courses will require candidates to interact with a broader community of researchers and practitioners through the review of published literature in the field and the participation in professional learning organizations.

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