Aug 20, 2022  
2020-2021 Graduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Chemistry Education

  
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    CHED 9900:Dissertation

    1- 9 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 1-9 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: 12 hours of graduate level research courses and admission to the Ed.D. Secondary Education program with a concentration in Chemistry
    Course work supports and guides doctoral candidates in the implementation of their research and the development and defense of the dissertation. This format and structure will provide individual time with the Doctoral Committee and collegial and academic support from their peers. Course may be repeated as necessary. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of graduate research study and admission to Ed.D. Secondary Education program with a concentration in Chemistry.

  
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    CHEM 7720:Cross-Cutting Concepts in Chemistry

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to Ed.S. or Ed.D. in Secondary Chemistry Education program
    Teachers enrolled in this course will explore the interdisciplinary nature of a topic in chemistry by examining how cross-cutting concepts are examined, measured, and tested in chemistry. The cross-cutting concepts investigated will include at least one of the following: patterns; cause and effect; scale, proportion, and quantity; systems and system models; energy and matter; structure and function; and stability and change.


Chinese

  
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    CHNS 7702:Chinese Linguistics

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MAT program in Foreign Languages.
    This course is a study of the most important aspects of Chinese linguistics, including the history of the language, linguistic reform, phonology, script, morphology, and syntax. This course will also examine classical and literary languages, modern standard language, and major dialects. Course taught primarily in Chinese.

  
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    CHNS 7704:Chinese Pedagogical Linguistics

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MAT in Foreign Languages.
    This course explores teaching and learning Chinese as a foreign language. Students will study major aspects of Chinese language and develop teaching strategies. Students will also examine the most commonly used textbooks and study computer-assisted language teaching and learning. Course taught primarily in Chinese.

  
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    CHNS 7712:Chinese Civilization and Traditions

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MAT program in Foreign Languages.
    This course explores Chinese civilization and traditions in pre-modern, modern and contemporary times, including cultural and political movements as well as economic development. Course taught in Chinese and English.

  
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    CHNS 7714:Topics in Chinese Culture

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MAT in Foreign Languages.
    This course analyzes selected aspects of Chinese culture, such as painting, calligraphy, seal engraving, music, theater, gardening, architecture, martial arts, qigong, and medicine. Course taught in Chinese.

  
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    CHNS 7722:Masterpieces of Chinese Literature

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MAT program in Foreign Languages.
    This course is a study of the most important works of Chinese literature from ancient times to the early twentieth century. The selected works represent China’s literary traditions, major genres, and literary techniques. Emphasis is given to textual analysis and the relationship between literary texts and Chinese language. Course is taught primarily in Chinese.

  
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    CHNS 7724:Chinese Literature and Film since 1978

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the MAT in Foreign Languages.
    This is a study of Chinese literature and film from 1978 to the present. It explores representative works of various literary trends. Emphasis will be given to the relationship between literary themes and sociocultural changes and developments. Course taught Chinese and English.


Civil Engineering

  
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    CE 6003:Probabilistic Analysis and Reliability in Civil Engineering

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Approval of advisor.
    Introduction to probability modeling and statistical analysis in civil engineering. Emphasis is on the practical applications of common probability models used in civil engineering. This course focuses on the application of statistical reasoning and is project-based.

  
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    CE 6101:Finite Element Analysis

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CE 3201 (or equivalent) or approval of instructor.
    Introduction to the use of finite element methods in structural analysis; the finite element formulation; 1- and 2-D elements; isoparametric elements; axisymmetric analysis; plate and shell elements; dynamics, buckling, and nonlinear analysis.

    • Discuss the fundamental concepts of the Finite Element Method.
    • Apply the basic properties, behavior and usage of different types of finite elements.
    • Prepare FE models and solve typical Civil Engineering problems using FEM.
    • Interpret and evaluate the quality of the results of FE simulations.


  
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    CE 6102:Structural Dynamics

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CE 3201 (or equivalent) or approval of instructor
    Analysis of the dynamic response of structures and structural components to transient loads and foundation excitation; single-degree-of-freedom and multi-degree-of-freedom systems; response spectrum concepts; structural response to earthquakes, design criteria, and seismic safety.

    • Estimate the fundamental natural frequency of simple structures.
    • Determine the vibration characteristics of simple systems.
    • Determine the resonance response of systems.
    • Determine dynamic response of simple structures under a general forcing function.
    • Use response spectra for earthquake loading.
    • Investigate multiple-degrees of freedom systems.
    • Model simple systems for earthquake analysis.
       


  
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    CE 6103:Prestressed Concrete Design

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CE 3201 or equivalent
    AISC design procedures for steel beams, joints, girders, columns, base plates and connections.

  
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    CE 6104:Advanced Geotechnical Engineering Foundation Design

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CE 3701 and CE 4105 (or equivalent) , or approval by instructor
    An advanced study of analysis and design of various foundation systems. Subjects include footings, piles, piers, caissons, retaining walls, and anchors. Topics include slope stability of embankments and dams, the applications of geotechnical reports and in-situ tests.

    • Design shallow and deep foundation systems
    • Design retaining walls
    • Design anchor systems
    • Investigate slope stabilities


  
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    CE 6105:Soil Improvement

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CE 3701 or approval of instructor
    A study of various soil improvement techniques for construction projects. Subjects include geosynthetics, admixtures, grouting methods, along with engineering properties of materials used in soil stabilizations.

    • Investigate and discuss alternative soil improvement methods satisfying the project requirements
    • Investigate and discuss the civil engineering design practices using the probability models


  
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    CE 6107:Design of Steel Structures

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Behavior and design of structural members and connections using Load and Resistance. Factor Design (LRFD) methods; mechanical properties of structural steel; design of tension members, compression members, beams and beam-columns; typical shear and moment connections, welded and bolted; and steel joist design.

  
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    CE 6133:Design of Wood Structures

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CE 3201 or equivalent
    The course introduces the design of wood structure and properties of wood. The course will cover the topics such as determination of horizontal and vertical loads, horizontal and vertical load-resisting systems, design of horizontal diaphragms, and bolted and nailed connections.

  
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    CE 6143:Advanced Structural Analysis

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CE 3201 or equivalent
    Analysis of indeterminate structures by the matrix force and displacement methods; Wind load calculation; Seismic load calculation; Introduction to lateral force resisting systems; Introduction to stability and collapse analysis of structural systems; Use of digital computers in structural analysis.

  
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    CE 6201:Transportation Planning

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CE 4177 or approval of instructor
    Introduction to urban transportation planning, travel characteristics, demand forecasting techniques, corridor studies, traffic impact studies, and public transit planning and operations.

    • Explain the classic four-step process to forecast travel demand understand their strengths and weaknesses
    • Understand the main concepts that describe traffic flow and methods of measurement, and calculate the performance measures needed to carry out the appropriate analysis.
    • Understand the key principles of geometric and pavement design and be familiar with important components of the road system.


  
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    CE 6202:Advanced Highway Design and Traffic Safety

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CE 4177 or approval of instructor
    Providing a safe and efficient transportation system for all users is the primary objective of federal, state, and local transportation agencies throughout the nation. Better highway design practices have been proven to be the most efficient approach to “safer roads”. This advanced highway design and traffic safety class is intended to provide the fundamentals of highway design and operation, human factors and vehicle characteristic and how they interact with the roadway, and highway safety analysis and different statistical techniques employed in the analysis.

    • Design different highway facilities and apply relevant highway design standards
    • Analyze crash and traffic data employing the appropriate statistical techniques
    • Conduct traffic safety studies, identify high-accident locations, and propose crash countermeasure and potential engineering solutions.


  
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    CE 6203:Advanced Bituminous and Concrete Materials

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CE 3501 or approval of instructor
    An advanced study on properties of aggregates, asphalt binder, Portland cement. Focuses on analysis and designs of hot-mix asphalt, and Portland cement concrete. Subjects include aggregate grading and blending, rheology of bituminous materials, chemical reactions and micro-structure of Portland cement concrete. Mixture designs, characterization, and special types of mixes will be included as well.

    • Design hot-mix asphalt mixture satisfying the project specific requirements
    • Design Portland cement concrete mixtures satisfying the project specific requirements


  
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    CE 6204:Advanced Design and Construction of Flexible and Rigid Pavements

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CE 3501 or approval of advisor
    Advanced analysis, behavior, performance, and structural design of highway and airport pavements. This course focuses on mechanistic characterization of pavement structures and on the approaches used to characterize existing structures for the purpose of rehabilitation. Subjects include advanced materials characterization, mechanistic modeling, nondestructive testing, and pavement rehabilitation, Airport pavement design and rehabilitation are also included.

    • Design flexible pavement
    • Design rigid pavement
    • Design overlays on deteriorated pavements


  
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    CE 6302:Air Pollution Control

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to program and CE 3702 or equivalent
    Fundamental concepts of air pollution. Emission sources, atmospheric dispersion, ambient concentrations, adverse effects, governmental regulations, emission standards, air-quality standards, processes and equipment for controlling emissions

    • To explain the structure and composition of atmosphere and determine the properties of gases and aerosols.
    • To explain the atmospheric, health and welfare effects of air pollution.
    • To calculate the kinetics and equilibrium of gas phase reactions in combustion systems and in the atmosphere.
    • To explain the scales of air motion, to determine the atmospheric stability and to calculate air dispersion.
    • To describe the principles of gaseous and particulate monitoring systems
    • To describe air regulations
    • To explain air resources topics to the professional society and general public
    • To design remediation processes for treatment of air


  
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    CE 6303:Water Resources Management

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CE 3343 or approval of instructor
    This course provides an introduction to water resources engineering and management, with an emphasis on water resources protection and water supply. Course content addresses technical aspects as well as the legal, regulatory and policy aspects of water resources management. Topics include surface water hydrology and watershed protection, development of water supplies, conjunctive use of groundwater and surface water, management of reservoirs and rivers, the role of probability and statistics, systems analysis techniques, and planning of water resources projects.

  
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    CE 6304:Advanced Hydraulics

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: ENGR 3343 or approval of instructor
    This course covers applications in pipe and open channel flow and hydraulic structures. Unsteady flow in pipes. Water hammer. Hydraulics of sediment transport. Spillway and design of small dams.

    • Analyze transient flow in pressure pipe
    • Analyze sedimentation and sediment transport phenomena
    • Apply principles of hydraulics for energy generation
    • Design spillways
    • Analyze and design energy dissipaters stilling basins
    • Analyze water quality data and interpret the water quality conditions in any waterways
    • Solve problems in groundwater hydrology using principles of hydraulics
    • Understand the issues of water planning and management
    • Apply basic principles of hydraulics and hydrology in urban water resources and environmental projects
    • Recognize the importance of incorporating the concept of sustainability in various water resources engineering design projects
    • Evaluate the economic impacts of water resource alternatives
    • Enhance student’s awareness of current water resources and environmental issues


  
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    CE 6333:Advanced Hazardous Waste Engineering

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CE 3702 or equivalent
    The course outlines the classification of hazardous wastes; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act regulations; characteristics and behavior of toxic organics; superfund; soil and groundwater contamination. This course covers hazardous waste site remedial action; case histories; sampling; and landfill design. Stabilization and processing technologies, including incineration, carbon adsorption, emerging techniques are also discussed.

  
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    CE 6343:Solid Waste Management and Engineering

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    The course discusses the advanced topics on solid waste treatment, storage, disposal, and control processes. Detailed design and regulatory requirements of solid waste landfills and other solid waste management facilities are also covered.

  
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    CE 6401:Master’s Thesis

    1-6 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 1-6 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Approval of instructor
    Independent study using a recognized research method.

  
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    CE 6433:Hydraulic Analysis and Design

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    The course applies principals of fluid mechanics to the design and analysis of hydraulic systems. The course emphasizes open channel flow and addresses topics of interest to the Civil Engineer. Topics include hydraulic grade line calculations, pump design, culvert analysis and design, based flood elevation studies using HEC-RAS, non-uniform flow, gutters and inlets, water distribution, open channel design.

  
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    CE 6533:Advanced Soil Mechanics

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CE 3701 or equivalent
    After brief review of drained and undrained shear strength of soils under transitional triaxial compression testing, the advanced topics to be covered in shear strength will include modified Mohr-Coulomb diagrams, including p-q diagrams, stress paths, triaxial extension and triaxial compression tests, and drained and undrained failure at principle stress difference versus principal stress ratio. In consolidation, the components of settlement and the effect of submergence on ultimate consolidation settlement will be covered.

  
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    CE 6603:Transportation Engineering

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: ENGR 3305 or equivalent
    Significance of highway transportation to the economy and society, road vehicle performance, geometric design of highways, pavement design, traffic flow and queuing theory capacity and level of service analysis.

  
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    CE 6613:Highway Design and Construction

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CE 4177 or equivalent.
    This course addresses the challenges facing engineers when designing and constructing highways with an emphasis on safety and efficiency.

  
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    CE 6633:Pavement Engineering

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: (CE 3201 and CE 3701) or equivalent
    A study of the methods used to determine thickness and composition of the components of both flexible and rigid highway pavements. Class work will also include paving materials, drainage systems, pavement distresses, and maintenance & rehabilitation. Standard techniques and computer software, the Asphalt Institute and AASHTO will be utilized in pavement thickness design.

  
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    CE 6683:Inelastic Behavior of Pavement Materials

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Introduction of theories in applied mechanics that govern the inelastic behavior of pavement materials. The topic areas will include linear and nonlinear viscoelasticity and continuum damage mechanics.

  
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    CE 6900:Special Topics in CE

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Exploration of a specifically designed topic or theme in Civil Engineering that meets the graduate level course requirements.


Coach Education

  
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    EDCO 7010:Introduction to Coaching

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    This is the first of the three courses in the Coaching Endorsement sequence. This course focuses on developing a knowledge base for coaching that is framed within an organization’s mission, vision, beliefs, and goals, and that is focused on performance criteria. Candidates develop skills in personal assessment; feedback techniques; collaboration; written, verbal, and non-verbal communication; and ethical behavior. Learning is supported by field-based practice that provides context for addressing the needs of various groups of learners and educators, particularly those from diverse and socio-linguistically varied backgrounds.

  
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    EDCO 7020:Using Data for Coaching

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: EDCO 7010  
    This course focuses on assessing the effectiveness of coaching on teaching, learning, and cultural context and is based on performance criteria. Candidates develop skills in identifying and implementing assessment tools, utilizing effective listening and questioning techniques, and analyzing and communicating assessment results. Learning is supported by field-based practice that provides context for addressing the needs of various groups of learners and educators, particularly those from diverse and socio-linguistically varied backgrounds.

  
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    EDCO 7030:Applied Coaching: Developing, Implementing, and Maintaining a Coaching Plan

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: EDCO 7010  and EDCO 7020  
    In this course, candidates will apply their knowledge, skills, and dispositions in coaching in real settings. More specifically, they will develop, maintain, and implement an effective coaching plan. Forty percent of this course is a field work practicum in which the coaching candidate will develop goals and a plan to achieve them in collaboration with a coach.


Communication

  
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    COM 5100:Survey of Digital and Social Media Concepts

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    This course examines theory and concepts relevant to social media. Along with emerging digital and social media theory, this course also explores the connection between foundations of media and communication as they apply to current situations, techniques, and trends. Students produce graduate-level research that expands the scholarly discourse in this area.

  
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    COM 5200:Digital Media Law

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to certificate program or permission of the instructor.
    This course provides an in-depth examination of the existing legal structure within which digital and social media operates, and the antecedent statutory and case law through which this structure has evolved. This course also addresses ethical concepts and considerations surrounding digital and social media. This course focuses on the First Amendment as it applies to free speech and the media, specific to online content.

    This course introduces students to different legal issues such as libel, disruptive speech, invasion of privacy, and copyright. It also teaches about different approaches to the First Amendment and how far freedom of speech and of the press goes in different legal scenarios. As a graduate course, students read several cases involving digital and social media. Students analyze texts and discuss the implication of law from theoretical and practical perspectives.
     

  
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    COM 5410:Digital Publication Design

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Acceptance to KSU graduate-student status.
    This course explores the nature and role of publication design through a study of visual communication theory; historical development of design; use of color, photography and graphics; and the use of design software and tools, including cloud computing and Drop Box. Students learn to exercise control over messages through coordination of text, images, and strategic design. Graphic design software (Adobe Creative Suites InDesign and Photoshop) and other online tools are used to develop an understanding of visual communication strategies and skills to create publications for communication to internal and external organizational audiences.

  
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    COM 5420:Mobile Media Technologies

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    This course introduces students to concepts connected with mobile media technology and with cyberculture, such as augmented reality, immersive worlds, and mobile learning and information design. Essentially this course critiques the basic theory and usability of social networking, mobile delivery, mobile content and technology, requiring you to engage and interact online.

  
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    COM 5490:Topics in Social Media

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Graduate student standing
    This course offers theoretical and applied approaches to social media theory, strategies and tactics used by communication professionals. Semester topics will vary. Potential topics include: social media analytics, social media monitoring, content development, theoretical approaches to understanding social media, search engine optimization and other topics related to trends in social media and social media management. This course may be taken up to two times for a total of six credit hours.

  
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    COM 5900:Digital and Social Media Content Strategy

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Students plan and create an applied project that reflects best professional practices, theory and existing research on digital and social media. The project is shared with the professional community via social networks. Students also create a summary of supporting literature, and an implementation and evaluation plan.

  
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    COM 6100:Survey of Digital and Social Media Concepts

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Digital and Social Media Certificate program or permission from the instructor.
    This course examines theory and concepts relevant to social media. Along with emerging digital and social media theory, this course also explores the connection between foundations of media and communication as they apply to current situations, techniques, and trends. Students produce graduate-level research that expands the scholarly discourse in this area.

  
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    COM 6200:Digital Media Law

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Digital and Social Media Certificate program or permission from the instructor.
    This course provides an in-depth examination of the existing legal structure within which digital and social media operates, and the antecedent statutory and case law through which this structure has evolved. This course also addresses ethical concepts and considerations surrounding digital and social media. This course focuses on the First Amendment as it applies to free speech and the media, specific to online content. This course introduces students to different legal issues such as libel, disruptive speech, invasion of privacy, and copyright. It also teaches about different approaches to the First Amendment and how far freedom of speech and of the press goes in different legal scenarios. As a graduate course, students read several cases involving digital and social media. Students analyze texts and discuss the implication of law from theoretical and practical perspectives.

  
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    COM 6410:Digital Publication Design

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Digital and Social Media Certificate program or permission from the instructor.
    This course explores the nature and role of publication design through a study of visual communication theory; historical development of design; use of color, photography and graphics; and the use of design software and tools, including cloud computing and Drop Box. Students learn to exercise control over messages through coordination of text, images, and strategic design. Graphic design software (Adobe Creative Suites InDesign and Photoshop) and other online tools are used to develop an understanding of visual communication strategies and skills to create publications for communication to internal and external organizational audiences.

  
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    COM 6420:Mobile Media Technologies

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Digital and Social Media Certificate program or permission from the instructor.
    This course provides an overview of the development of mobile media applications as part of advancing your understanding of new media technologies. Furthermore, this course introduces students to concepts connected with mobile media technology as it relates to mobile applications. Essentially this course critiques the basic theory and usability of mobile delivery, mobile content, and mobile technology, requiring you to engage and interact online.

  
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    COM 6490:Topics in Social Media

    1-3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 1-3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Digital and Social Media Certificate program or permission from the instructor.
    This course offers theoretical and applied approaches to social media theory, strategies and tactics used by communication professionals. Semester topics will vary. Potential topics include: social media analytics, social media monitoring, content development, theoretical approaches to understanding social media, search engine optimization and other topics related to trends in social media and social media management. This course may be taken up to two times for a total of six credit hours.

  
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    COM 6670:Crisis Leadership Communication

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: COM 7400   or permission of the instructor
    Leaders need communication skills and requisite knowledge to guide organizations through the tumultuous crises of the future. This course addresses numerous content areas, including: factors involved in decision-making under pressure; training and organizational skills in crisis management communication as a core competency; and leading in local and transboundary crises through an integrated approach for organizations with different decision-making structures, different resource commitments to crisis preparations and response, and different communication and cultural strategies.

  
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    COM 6690:Topics in Integrated Global Communication

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: COM 7100  or permission of the graduate director 
    This course offers theoretical and applied approaches to global communication from perspectives of mass media, public relations and organizational communication. Semester topics will vary. Potential topics include: communication leadership trends and strategies, media ownership, global news trends, and media’s influence on people’s lives.

  
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    COM 6900:Digital and Social Media Content Strategy

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Digital and Social Media Certificate program or permission from the instructor.
    Students plan and create an applied project that reflects best professional practices, theory, and existing research on digital and social media. The project is shared with the professional community via social networks. Students also create a summary of supporting literature, and an implementation and evaluation plan.

  
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    COM 7100:Survey of Global Communication

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    This course provides an overview of global communication, its modern development and the role of information technology; global communication law and policies; global news and information flow; global communication in transnational and global companies; global public relations; global advertising; and issues in global communication.

  
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    COM 7200:Foundations in Communication Theory and Research

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    This course introduces graduate students to three elements that are crucial to success in a graduate program: understanding the role of and approaches to graduate research at KSU; appreciating the importance of the rationale employed to understand ways in which the world around us works in the context of the communication process; and exploring ways to test or make sense of that rationale.

  
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    COM 7300:International Public Relations

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    This course examines the principles and concepts of practicing public relations globally including cultural, political and economic considerations; organizational goals and objectives; the role of traditional media; and the challenges new media technologies are bringing to public relations for corporate and government entities.

  
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    COM 7350:Principles of Strategic Communication

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Integrated Global Communication graduate program
    This class examines how public relations, marketing, and advertising have adapted to address new forms of innovative communication. This course may be described as an account planning class. It will examine the research process that results in a tailored campaign strategy that communicates a brand’s message.

  
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    COM 7400:Communication Research Methods

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: COM 7300  
    This course deals with analysis of types of problems, concepts, definitions, variables, methods and measurement techniques as well as interpretation of data prevalent in communication research. The purpose of this course is to guide students to conduct elementary statistics, design research and develop their own research proposals.

  
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    COM 7500:Communication for Multinational Corporations

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    The ever intensified globalization has motivated and forced many business people to work cross-culturally. Intercultural communication has become an integral component for business and managerial education. Effective communication is a vital skill for everyone in business today, especially for those who work in multinational corporations. Great communicators have a distinct advantage in building successful businesses and careers. Effective intercultural business communication requires one not only to be proficient with business strategy and linguistic skills, but also to be competent with intercultural communication and multicultural negotiation capabilities. Using case studies conducted at multinational corporations across the globe, this course introduces students to the world of international business and management by studying key concepts of intercultural communication, negotiation, international trade and global team-building. Such areas as cultural and sub-cultural differences, changing organizational structures, advanced communication technologies, and verbal and nonverbal communication channels will be covered in this course.

  
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    COM 7600:Communication and Technology Seminar

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    This course continues what students began learning in the global communication theory seminar. This course focuses on how technology impacts the communication process in five specific areas: public relations, advertising, political communication, citizen media, and law. It will look at the legal, social, and economic implications of technology in each of these areas. Students will be able to examine and critique technology’s role in the communication field. Specifically, they will examine the role technology has on public communication.

  
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    COM 7700:Integrated Global Communication Directed Study

    6 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 6 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: COM 7400  
    Integrated Global Communication Directed Study offers students in the MAIGC opportunities to conduct individual research abroad or choose from a pool of courses offered by KSU partner institutions abroad, under the supervision of a KSU instructor of record. This course is one of the four options students may choose as part of the Summer International Experience in the MAIGC. Approval from the director of the MAIGC for all directed study projects is required. A student pursuing an individual research project must work with a MAIGC faculty member who will supervise the student’s progress and provide guidance for the desired outcome of the project. Students interested in enrolling in classes offered by a KSU partner institution abroad must receive approval from the director of the MAIGC.

  
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    COM 7710:Integrated Global Communication Practicum

    6 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 6 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: COM 7400  
    Students will work abroad or domestically for the summer term for a for-profit organization with global reach on projects with international implications. Emphasis will be placed on contrasting American and foreign culture communication traditions. Students will learn the historical background and recent contemporary backdrop to foreign country communication practices, structures, and organization.

  
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    COM 7720:Integrated Global Communication Study Abroad

    6 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 6 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: COM 7400  
    Students may choose from among the many KSU study abroad courses offered by KSU faculty during the summer terms as one of the four options for the Summer International Experience in the MAIGC. Permission of the director of the MAIGC is required and students must work with the KSU Education Abroad Office to find KSU study abroad courses appropriate for the Summer International Experience. Students are expected to meet the expectations of the KSU instructor of record for the KSU study abroad course.

  
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    COM 7730:Integrated Global Communication Study Tour

    6 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 6 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: COM 7400  
    This course examines public relations, organizational communication and other facets of communication integral to coordinating global communication messages across cultures in professional settings. Emphasis will be placed on contrasting American and host country communication traditions. Students will learn the historical background and recent contemporary backdrop to host country communication practices, structures and organization. Numerous examples of host country communication practices will be observed through visits to local, national, and global corporations and communication organizations. Students will hear lectures from experts in host country organizations.

  
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    COM 7900:Integrated Global Communication Capstone

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: COM 7700 , COM 7710 , COM 7720 , or COM 7730  
    This course is the culminating experience for students in the MAIGC. Students work individually or in teams to develop either an original scholarly research project related to global communication, or an integrated global communication professional project for a client. Students meet weekly for instruction and direction with the instructor and recruit a graduate faculty member to be a reviewer/reader for the thesis/project. At the end of the course, all students present their projects in a public forum.

  
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    COM 8200:Communication with Asian Partners

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission into any KSU graduate program.
    This course explores communication strategies with Asian partners in global business, political and organizational contexts. Through lectures, discussions, case studies and guest speeches, students develop a deep appreciation of intercultural sensitivity, especially when communicating with peoples of Asian cultures. Students analyze commonalities and differences in communication styles among Asian cultural groups. In particular, students develop relationship building, negotiation and conflict resolution skills with partners of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indian and Islamic cultural backgrounds.


Computer Science

  
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    ACS 6810:HPC Data Warehousing and Mining

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Graduate-level Admission
    This course covers concepts, techniques, and applications of data warehousing and data mining. Topics discussed in this course include: dimensional modeling, extraction-transformation-loading (ETL), online analytical processing (OLAP), classification, clustering, association mining, and regression analysis. Some advanced topics in machine learning will be also be discussed in class, such as kernel machines and deep learning.

  
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    ACS 6830:HPC Modern Programming Languages

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Graduate Admission in Computer Science
    Students will study Python, R, Parallel Fortran, ECL, Thor, and Roxie languages. Topics will also include variable storage, control structures, linking and binding, exceptions. This course reviews the fundamental concepts of programming languages and how languages are translated for execution.

  
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    ACS 6840:HPC, Cloud, and Parallel Computing

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission as a graduate CS student
    This course will cover High Performance Computing topics including parallel computing, cluster computing, grid computing, cloud computing, and quantum computing. Also covers basics of big data analytics platform and basic program skills on HPC and ECL.

  
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    ACS 7010:Data Structures with C++

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Program admission.
    This course covers both linear and non-linear data structures by using an object-oriented approach, based on the notion of the Standard Template Library (STL) container classes. Modern C++ constructs is used in developing data structures and their applications.
     

  
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    ACS 7030:Database Systems with Java Applications

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Program admission.
    This course covers knowledge in database management systems, database processing, data modeling, database design, development, and implementation. Java programming language will be used to develop database applications.
     

  
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    ACS 7410:Parallel and Distributed Computing

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: ACS 7010  
    This course covers fundamental programming principles in the increasingly important area of shared-memory programming using OpenMP, distributed-memory programming using MPI, and data center programming using MapReduce.
     

  
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    ACS 7420:Algorithm Design for Big Data

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: ACS 7410  
    This course covers advanced algorithms and data structures that are scalable to big data in a distributed computing environment. Topics include MapReduce algorithm design principles, algorithms for processing big text data, algorithms for analyzing big graph, and large-scale machine learning and data mining algorithms.
     

  
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    ACS 7510:HPC Infrastructure

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: ACS 7010  
    This course covers hardware infrastructure and software architecture for high performance computing platforms including cluster computing platform, grid computing platform, and cloud computing platform.
     

  
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    ACS 8310:Data Warehousing

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: ACS 7030  
    This course covers the fundamentals of data warehousing architecture and issues involved in planning, designing, building, populating a successful data warehouse system. Topics covered in the course include requirement analysis, dimensional modeling, physical design, extraction-transformation-load (ETL) design and development, Analysis Service Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) database, data mining, and business intelligence (BI) applications.
     

  
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    ACS 8430:Text and Web Mining

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: ACS 7420  

    This course covers techniques of mining text and web data. Topics include text/web retrieval, text/web clustering, text/web categorization, text summarization, social network analysis, and web log mining. 

  
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    ACS 8510:Large-Scale Distributed Database Systems

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: ACS 7410  and ACCT 8310  

    This course covers a distributed and non‐SQL database technology designed for processing big data. Topics include data model, database architecture, and database applications.

  
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    CS 5000:Foundations of Programming

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    The course covers foundations of programming with emphasis on program design and computer science concepts. A modern, Object-Oriented language is used. Topics include primitive data types, arithmetic and logical operators, selection and repetition structures, methods, arrays, objects and classes, inheritance, polymorphism, exception handling, and file I/O. Programming projects are included.

  
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    CS 5020:Computer Organization and Architecture

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    This course covers the following topics: Number Systems, Two-level combinational logic, Multilevel combinational logic, Sequential logic design, Finite state machine design, Arithmetic circuits, Assembly and machine languages with a focus on concepts, and the principles of computer organization. The objective of this course is to learn the Concepts of Digital Systems, Combinational Circuits, Sequential Circuits, and Computer Architecture.

  
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    CS 5040:Data Structures and Algorithms

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 5000  
    The course covers data structures and algorithms including runtime analysis and big-oh notation. A modern language will be used. Topics include dynamically allocating memory, pointer declaration and use, and the implementation of data structures such as lists, stacks, queues, binary search trees, and graphs. Analysis techniques are provided, such as the growth of functions, advanced sorting techniques, elementary graph algorithms, and minimum spanning trees. Programming projects are included.

  
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    CS 5060:Database Design

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    This course will provide a practical foundation of database systems with emphasis on relational database design, implementation, and management. Topics include normalization, ERD, logical and physical design, SQL query, database applications, usage of XML in database, and data warehouse.

  
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    CS 5070:Mathematical Structures for Computer Science

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    This course covers discrete mathematics topics, including elementary set theory, relations, functions, principles of counting, graphs, formal logic, recursion, and mathematical proof methods. This course includes introduction to formal languages such as regular and context-free languages. Emphasis is given to how mathematics relates to computer science.

  
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    CS 6021:Advanced Computer Architecture

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Coursework in computer architecture and operating systems, or CS 5020  as per admissions analysis.
    Topics include computer performance issues, instruction set architectures, RISC versus CISC, performance enhancing techniques, memory hierarchy (including cache memory), pipelining, multiprocessor architectures, and implications to operating system design.

  
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    CS 6025:Operating Systems

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 5020  
    Courses that may be taken concurrently:
    CS 5040 
    This course covers Operating Systems topics including memory and process management for high-performance computing and architectures, advanced threading/concurrency, and distributed architectures and computing. The course provides in-depth study of operating systems with emphasis on performance modeling with simulation and reading research papers on the various advanced topics of operating systems. Discussion of grid computing and cloud computing, virtualization and hypervisors, scheduling for real-time, symmetric multiprocessing and hardware multithreading, effects and control of hardware caches. This course includes a research project.

  
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    CS 6027:Computer Networks

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 5000  and CS 5020 
    This course aims to provide a foundation in data communications and computer networks. Topics include layered network protocols with emphasis on functionality and analysis such as digital data transmission and encoding, layered protocol models (OSI), Internet protocol (TCP/IP), Internet client-server software, and network design methodology.

  
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    CS 6041:Theory of Computation

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 5070  
    Courses that may be taken concurrently:
    CS 5040  
    This course covers theoretical topics of computer science including automata, formal languages (such as regular and context-free languages), grammars, Turing machines, algorithms, nondeterminism, computability, decidability, and complexity. Topics also include intractable and NP-complete problems for graphs (such as TSP, Node Cover, Hamiltonian Circuit, Independent Set) and polynomial reducibility.

  
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    CS 6045:Advanced Algorithms

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 5040  and CS 5070  
    This course covers advanced algorithm design strategies and analysis using formal and mathematical techniques. Topics include asymptotic analyses of complexity bounds using big-O, little-o, omega, and theta notations. The algorithmic strategies (brute-force, greedy, divide-and-conquer, recursive backtracking, dynamic programming, branch-and-bound, heuristics, and space-and-time tradeoffs) are covered. Also included are standard graph and tree algorithms. Additional topics may include amortized analysis, NP completeness, basic approximate algorithms, and introduction to polynomial reduction.

  
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    CS 6070:Database Systems

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 5000  
    This course provides in-depth coverage of database management systems, database processing, data modeling, database design, development, and implementation. Particular emphasis is placed on the relational approach to database management and processing. This course includes implementation of current DBMS tools and SQL. Ethical and security topics related to databases will be discussed.

  
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    CS 7050:Data Warehousing and Mining

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 6070  or a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree.
    Courses that may be taken concurrently:
    CS 6045  
    This course covers prominent algorithms and techniques for developing effective, efficient, and scalable data warehousing and data mining tools. Topics discussed in this course include: data visualization, data integration, data warehousing, online analytical processing, data cube technology, advanced pattern mining, advanced classification analysis, advanced clustering analysis, outlier detection, data mining trends and research frontiers.

  
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    CS 7060:Mobile Intelligence

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 7455  
    This course covers advanced and/or intelligent mobile application development. Topics include cross-platform mobile application development, mobile augmented reality, and mobile business intelligence. 

  
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    CS 7070:Advanced Networking Protocols

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 7425  
    This course covers the study of the modern networking protocols, including the TCP/IP protocol suite, addressing, IPV6, routing, security.

  
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    CS 7075:Artificial Intelligence and Robotics

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 6021   
    This is a survey course covering topics in Artificial Intelligence and Autonomous Robotics. A survey of AI methods and approaches from search methods to neural networks will include hands-on with expert systems. A robotics kit will be included to allow students to analyze, design, build, and test simple robotic systems running autonomously.

  
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    CS 7125:Cloud Computing

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 5020  or Equivalent
    In this course we will discuss concepts including cloud computing, cloud computing architecture, Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS), etc. We will study commercial products such as Amazon EC2. We will also discuss advanced topics such as Cloud simulation tools and open sourced software for Cloud environment.

  
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    CS 7172:Parallel and Distributed Computing

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 6025  or a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree.
    This course covers various aspects of parallel and distributed processing and algorithm design with emphasis on programming. Topics include: Taxonomy of parallel architectures; Shared-memory vs. message-passing architectures; Computation models and Performance metrics; Parallel/distributed algorithm design techniques; Parallel/distributed programming techniques - partitioning, load balancing, synchronization, task scheduling, and message overheads; Parallel/distributed algorithms for sorting and matrices; and Debugging, profiling, and performance enhancements of parallel and distributed programs.

  
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    CS 7174:Modeling and Simulation

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    The course covers an overview of modeling and simulation of the structure and behavior of real-world systems using object-oriented discrete-event simulation techniques. Students select an advanced topic in modeling and simulation to develop a research project and paper.

  
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    CS 7253:Graph Algorithms

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 6041  and CS 6045  
    This course covers several classical and modern topics in graph algorithms with emphasis on developing problem-solving skills with graph algorithms. Topics include graph embedding, graph clustering, distances in graphs, flows in graphs, graph compression, and algorithmic graph-minor theory.

  
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    CS 7260:Advanced Database Systems

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 5060  or equivalent or Admission to PhD in Analytics and Data Science program
    This course will cover advanced concepts and techniques in database systems. Topics include advanced concepts in relational databases, data warehousing and mining, and NoSQL distributed database technology for big data analytics.

  
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    CS 7263:Information Retrieval

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 6041  and CS 6045  
    This course is an introduction to information retrieval for knowledge discovery. It covers algorithms, design, and implementation of modern information retrieval systems. This course introduces a variety of basic principles, techniques and modern advances for searching, managing, and mining information. Topics include Search engine architecture, Retrieval models, Retrieval evaluation, Relevance feedback, Link analysis, and Search applications.

  
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    CS 7265:Big Data Analytics

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 6045  or Admission to the Analytics and Data Science, Ph.D.
    This course covers algorithms and tools for building MapReduce Applications with Hadoop or Spark for processing gigabyte, terabyte, or petabyte-sized datasets on clusters of commodity hardware. This course discusses a wide range of data sets and learning algorithms.

  
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    CS 7267:Machine Learning

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 6045  or Admission to the Analytics and Data Science, Ph.D.
    This course covers the-state-of-the-art machine learning techniques. It covers machine learning methods in supervised learning, unsupervised learning, and ensemble. This course includes applications of advanced machine learning techniques to solve challenging problems.

  
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    CS 7327:Computer Graphics and Multimedia

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Coursework in Data Structures or CS 5040  as determined by program admission
    A study of the algorithms and principles of interactive 3D computer graphics, this course focuses on the rendering of graphical data with an emphasis on real-time systems. Topics include standards, supporting mathematics (including matrix and vector operations), the graphics pipeline, coordinate systems, lighting calculations, texturing, file formats and shader-based rendering. Major project included.

  
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    CS 7347:Natural Language Processing

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: CS 6041  and CS 7843  
    This course introduces the theory and practice of Natural Language Processing (NLP). It covers modern NLP techniques for computers to understand natural language and to produce services such as language translation, question answering, conversation agent, and performing any language-related tasks. This course covers major problems in NLP such as word similarities, parsing, machine translation, entity recognition, question answering, and sentence comprehension. This course includes the design and development of NLP systems and applications.

 

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