Dec 08, 2022  
2014-2015 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2014-2015 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

History

  
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    HIST 3357 - Africans in Asia

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    A survey of the history of people of African descent in Asia from the African beginnings to the present. The course evaluates the historical significance of the African presence in the Middle East, India, Southeast Asia, and China. It emphasizes the historical contacts and connection between Africa and Asia, the forced migration of Africans in the age of Islamic expansion and imperialism, the comparative experiences of Africans in bondage and freedom, and their integration into the host societies.

  
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    HIST 3358 - Africans in Latin America and the Caribbean

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    A history of the people of African descent in Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States, from the African beginnings to 1888. The course will examine the forced migration of Africans; their roles in the conquest and settlement of Spanish America, Brazil, and the West Indies; and their comparative experiences under plantation slavery. It will emphasize their resistance and emancipation, and their contributions to the development of the multiracial character of Latin American and Caribbean societies.

  
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    HIST 3360 - Russian Empire to 1917

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    The history of the Russian Empire from its early beginnings to the Revolution of 1917. The course emphasizes the importance of Greco-Roman and Asian influences, the impact of the Russian Empire on eastern Europe and eastern Asia, and the political, social, cultural, and revolutionary ideas that have created modern Russia.

  
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    HIST 3361 - Themes in Slavic and Eastern European Studies

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    This course is an introduction to the history, politics, arts, and culture of Slavic and Eastern Europe with a concentration on the last two centuries and contemporary events. After a brief historical survey, students examine prominent themes such as nationalism, ethnicity, state-building, and imperialism. Many themes are analyzed using examples from the arts, popular culture, music, and literature.

  
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    HIST 3366 - History of Mexico and Central America

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    Examines the Mesoamerican pre-classic civilizations, the Aztec Empire and the Maya kingdoms, the Spanish conquest and establishment of New Spain, and the independent nation-states of Mexico and Central America. Themes include Spanish colonialism, the Indian struggle for justice, modern nation-state building, and relations with the United States.

  
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    HIST 3367 - History of Brazil

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    A study of Brazil, to include the Native American period, Portuguese colonialism, the Empire of Brazil, and Brazil in the 20th century. Major themes are sugar and slavery, boom and bust economic cycles, the formation of the Brazilian social identity, Brazil and the Amazon, and Brazil’s place in the contemporary global world.

  
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    HIST 3372 - Ancient to Pre-Modern China

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    This course introduces the main themes in Chinese history from the Neolithic to 1600; discusses how traditional cultures and outside influences have interacted to produce traditional China; explores the great diversity and impressive continuities of traditional Chinese civilization; and assesses the significance of the institutions of state, family, and women in Chinese history.

  
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    HIST 3373 - Modern India and South Asia

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    Emphasizes how Hindu, Buddhist, Islamic, and other traditional cultures combined with British colonial rule and other modernizing influences to produce the India of today. Some attention is also given to peripheral areas, particularly Pakistan and Bangladesh.

  
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    HIST 3374 - Modern China and Japan

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    Focuses chiefly upon China and Japan, with some consideration of Korea, emphasizing how traditional cultures, outside influences, and modernizing forces have interacted to produce the East Asia of today. Covers the period 1600 to the present.

  
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    HIST 3375 - Silk Road

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    The Silk Road was the world’s first great superhighway, linking China and Japan to the Mediterranean World across Central Asia from ancient times. The peoples along the way traded luxury goods as well as ideas, religions, art, culinary and musical traditions. Through lectures, reading, and films, we explore the cultural interactions between East and West. Primary sources help us understand the great ideas in Buddhism, Islam, the Indian royal epics, Christian crusading and Mongol expansion.

  
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    HIST 3376 - Historiographical Debates

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110 and HIST 2206.
    Investigates the major limits and problems inherent in historical understanding and introduces the student to philosophies of history that have sought to address those problems. Case studies of major historical controversies help students recognize the important ways those limits and problems influence even the greatest scholar’s efforts at historical analysis.

  
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    HIST 3377 - History of Science

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    History of scientific ideas and methods from ancient times to the present, with special emphasis on intellectual trends that contributed to the modern world’s scientific outlook.

  
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    HIST 3378 - History of Technology

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: None.
    This course examines technology as a factor in historical change, emphasizing the role of tools, machines, and systems in revolutions, culture, politics, and economics. Students engage historiographical debates and readings on the role of technology in the recent and distant past. More broadly, students develop a critical understanding of the role of humanistic inquiry in technological knowledge through biographies, case studies, and primary source documents.

  
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    HIST 3379 - Central Asia in World History

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    This course provides an advanced introduction to the history of Central Asia from a global perspective. It covers a large territory including Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kirgizstan, and Tajikistan. This course focuses on the changes and continuities in the cultures and societies that flourished in this region during the times of major transformations with global significance, such as the expansion of the Mongolian Empire, spread of Islam, encounters with modernity, and emergence of the nation states.

  
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    HIST 3382 - North Africa and the Middle East in Modern Times

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    A history of North Africa and the Middle East since the emergence of Islam. Major themes include the rise of Berber-Arab/Islamic civilization, the historical ties between North Africa and the Middle East, and the impact of Ottoman rule. Consideration of the 20th century includes European imperialism, the advent of military rule, the establishment of Israel, Arab-Israeli wars and the search for peace, pan-Arabism and the independence movement in Maghrib, petroleum and international politics, the rise of Muslim fundamentalism, and the problems of economic development and modernization.

  
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    HIST 3388 - Major Themes in Environmental History

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110 and HIST 2112.
    The course focuses how the natural environment and human societies have influenced one another throughout history. Students study the origins of the environmental movement and the individuals and forces that have shaped modern ecological thinking. Selected topics and themes include both world and American history.

  
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    HIST 3390 - History of the Atlantic World

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    This course exposes students to the momentous socioeconomic transformations that occurred in the Atlantic basin in the wake of Christopher Columbus’s voyage of 1492. The changes were engendered by the convergence of diverse cultural groups and the complex social and economic networks that they established in the Atlantic basin. Students examine the complex interconnections, the consequences, and the resultant new social and economic institutions which significantly informed our contemporary world.

  
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    HIST 3391 - History of West Africa

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    A history of West Africa from the earliest times to the present. The course emphasizes cultural continuities and changes, trade and cultural ties with North Africa, and contemporary challenges of economic development and nation building in the region. It examines important themes like village, urban, and community life; the formation of mini and mega states such as Ghana, Mali, and Songhai empires; the creation of trans-Saharan and trans-Atlantic trade networks; traditional religion, Islam, and Christianity; European colonialism and African resistances; and decolonization.

  
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    HIST 3392 - History of Southern, Eastern and Central Africa

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    A history of Southern, Eastern, and Central Africa from the earliest times to the present. The course emphasizes continuities and changes in African culture, African participation in Indian Ocean and Middle Eastern trade networks, and the impact of European colonization. It examines important themes like Bantu migration and state formation in Central Africa; the emergence of the Ethiopian kingdom; the impact of the Zulu Mfecane; Swahili culture and Omani rule in East Africa; Dutch settlement and the development of apartheid; and the achievement of Black majority rule in South Africa.

  
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    HIST 3393 - Emerging Themes in African History

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    A survey of major themes in African cultural history from the earliest times to the beginning of European colonialism. The course introduces students to the peoples, societies, and cultures of the continent and emphasizes dominant themes such as cultural unity and diversity, empire and civilization, kinship and family, ethnic and nation building, Islam and traditional religions, indigenous institutions, slavery, and sociopolitical transformations before European colonialism.

  
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    HIST 3396 - Cooperative Study

    1-3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Approval of the co-op coordinator.
    A supervised work experience program for a minimum of two academic semesters at a site in business, industry, or government. For sophomore, junior, or senior level students who wish to obtain successive on the job experience in conjunction with their academic training.

  
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    HIST 3398 - Internship

    1-9 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: 60 Credit Hours.
    A supervised, credit-earning work experience of one academic semester with a previously approved business firm, or private or government agency.

    Notes: Credit is allowed in elective areas.
  
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    HIST 4400 - Directed Study

    1-3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110 and HIST 2112.
    Covers special topics and seminars external to regular course offerings.

  
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    HIST 4410 - Colonial America to 1763

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
    Starting in the pre-Columbian period, this course covers the American experience until 1763. It looks at Native American life, colonization and settlement by the Spanish, French and English, interaction with the Atlantic world, and the wars for imperial dominance fought in North America until 1763. Issues explored include class structure and family life, religion, politics, intellectual movements, society and culture, slavery, and treatment of minorities.

  
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    HIST 4411 - The American Revolution

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
    Examines the American Revolution from the start of the colonists’ disputes with Britain through the ratification of the Constitution. Issues covered include the development of tensions between Britain and the colonies during the Seven Years’ War and decade-long dispute over taxation, the decision to declare independence and the Revolutionary War, the postwar Confederation government, and the creation of the Constitution. The roles of women, Native Americans, African Americans, and loyalists are also examined.

  
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    HIST 4412 - The Early Republic

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
    This course will explore the history of the United States from 1787-1824. Topics and issues covered will include the creation of the Constitution, the formation of the first party system, the growth and development of the federal government, the young republic’s foreign policy, the War of 1812, the Market Revolution, the Era of Good Feelings, and the development of a uniquely American culture. Social, economic, political, and military aspects of the American experience will be addressed.

  
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    HIST 4415 - Jacksonian America

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
    This course will explore the history of the United States from 1815-1848. Topics and issues covered will include the War of 1812, the Market Revolution, the Era of Good Feelings, the rise of Andrew Jackson, Indian Removal, the formation of the second party system, the rise of the reformist impulse, sectional disruptions caused by territorial expansion and slavery, the annexation of Texas, the Mexican War, and the continued development of a uniquely American culture. Social, economic, political, and military aspects of the American experience will be studied.

  
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    HIST 4425 - Oral History

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
    Focuses on the methods of taking, processing, and utilizing oral histories. Additional emphasis is placed on the study of planning, development, and operation of oral history projects for libraries, museums, corporations, and public history agencies.

  
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    HIST 4426 - Documentation and Interpretation of Historic Sites

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
    Explores the methods of documenting historic properties, especially as related to the National Register of Historic Places. Special emphasis is placed on completing a nomination for the National Register of Historic Places. Includes interpretation of historic sites for public exhibit.

  
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    HIST 4428 - The Third Reich

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 2112 or HIST 1110.
    This course draws a wide range of texts to place the Third Reich (1933-1945) in a broad historical context to understand its rise, causes, consequences, and legacies.

  
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    HIST 4430 - Museum Studies

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
    Provides a broad introduction to the museum world and the functions of museums in American society. Emphasis will be placed on historical museums. Subjects covered will include museum management, collections management, education, interpretation, exhibit design, ethics, and scholarly criticism of museums.

  
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    HIST 4435 - History and Memory

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
    This seminar experience examines the literature of public history and memory. Through readings and discussion the class will examine what we know about the past and how we know it, the changing interpretation of historical events over time, the shape and influence of historical memory, the politics of historical interpretation, and the public presentation of history.

  
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    HIST 4440 - Medieval Europe

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    A survey of the origins of European culture. Focuses on the period between the fourth and the fourteenth centuries, during which time Europe achieved its own form of cultural unity distinct from that of its Mediterranean neighbors.

  
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    HIST 4442 - History of Religious Tolerance

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    This course traces the origins of the concept of tolerance of the religious “other,” with a focus of content on medieval and Early Modern Europe. Besides the historical exploration of the topic and an examination of the emergence and development of the idea of religious toleration against a background of persecution and wars of religion, students also examine and discuss philosophical and practical aspects of religious tolerance today.

  
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    HIST 4444 - Renaissance and Reformation Europe

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    A survey of the changing patterns of thought that radically altered European society between the 14th and 17th centuries. The renaissance of art, the triumph of individualism, the rise of Protestantism, and the reformation of the Church will be studied in their social, political, and intellectual contexts.

  
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    HIST 4445 - Age of Enlightenment

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    A contextualized discussion of major developments in European thought during the eighteenth century. Topics include rationalism and the notion of the social applicability of science, the idea of progress, the critique of established religion, economic theories such as those of the Physiocrats, and epistemological interests as expressed in the Encyclopedie of Diderot and d’Alembert, as well as the increased cosmopolitanism and the importance of extra-European models (especially the Chinese Confucian model).

  
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    HIST 4451 - Civil War and Reconstruction

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
    Causes and development of the U.S. Civil War from 1830. Includes an analysis of the political, social, and economic aspects of the Reconstruction Era.

  
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    HIST 4453 - World War I

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    This course provides an overview of the major issues and events surrounding the First World War, exposing students to its opposing governments, leaders, military forces, and major battles, aspects that shaped the conduct and outcome of this momentous international confrontation. It affords students an understanding of the political, military, and social histories of the war and the long-range political and social implications and consequences of the treaty that came at its conclusion.

  
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    HIST 4454 - Twentieth Century Europe

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    A survey of European history from 1914 to the present. The course focuses on the main forces that have shaped Europe such as the Second Industrial Revolution and the development of mass society. It examines women’s issues; the rise of Fascism; the impact of existentialism on philosophy, literature, and art; the collapse of Euro-communism; and progress toward European Union.

  
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    HIST 4455 - Twentieth Century Russia

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    A study of Russia in the 20th century that examines in detail the birth, life, international influence, death, and aftermath of the Soviet Union and relates these events to Russian and world history.

  
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    HIST 4456 - World War II

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110.
    A survey of the causes, events, and results of World War II. The course emphasizes military history and the global nature of the conflict but also examines the economic, political, and diplomatic aspects of the war.

  
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    HIST 4461 - Gilded Age & Progressive Era

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
    An examination of the expansion, industrialization, and urbanization of the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and of the era’s cultural, political, economic, intellectual, and social issues.

  
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    HIST 4471 - Recent United States History

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 2112.
    Recent United States History, 1939-present. Considers domestic political history, an overview of foreign policy, economic growth and change, and social and cultural reform movements.

  
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    HIST 4475 - War and Revolution in Southeast Asia

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110 and HIST 2112.
    Studies the responses of the traditional cultures of Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia to outside influences and modernizing forces in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; considers both world wars and the Indochina Wars in the context of the Cold War and their impact on Europe and the United States.

  
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    HIST 4488 - Approaches to World History

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110, HIST 2206, and HIST 2271.
    This course is an examination of the various approaches to world history as a field of study, comprising the important debates and controversies in the tradition. The course includes a consideration of contemporary debates and recent developments on topics such as modernization and its place and significance in world history. The examination also includes a critique of the conceptualization of world history in today’s classroom and suggests possible alternatives.

  
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    HIST 4490 - Special Topics in History

    1-3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HIST 1110 and HIST 2112.
    Selected special topics of interest to faculty and students.

  
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    HIST 4499 - Senior Seminar

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in HIST 2270 AND HIST 3376.
    A combined tutorial and seminar in which students research and write a senior thesis in addition to making a computer based presentation in class.


History Education

  
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    HIED 4413 - Teaching of Social Sciences (6-12)

    6 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 6 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: All required EDUC courses and admission to the Teacher Education program, HIST 2271, and 24 hours of upper-level teaching field courses (including HIST 3304 and HIST 4488), GPA of at least 3.0 in that content course work, and permission of the program coordinator.
    An examination and application of curriculum issues, learning theories, teaching strategies, instructional materials, and assessment procedures for teaching secondary school social science in the multicultural and diverse classrooms of today. Emphasizes those practices suggested by research in secondary social science education and encouraged by our accrediting agencies.

  
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    HIED 4414 - Teaching of Social Sciences Practicum

    0 Class Hours 9 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to HIED 4413.
    Secondary school field experience in social science teaching with concurrent seminars. Proof of professional liability insurance is required prior to school placement.




  
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    HIED 4475 - Student Teaching: Social Sciences (6-12)

    12 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching.
    Full-time teaching experience in social sciences under the supervision of a secondary school cooperating teacher and a specialist in history education. Includes regularly scheduled seminars.

  
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    HIED 4490 - Special Topics in History Education

    1-6 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and department chair.
    Selected special topics of interest to faculty and students.

  
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    HIED 4498 - Internship in Teaching Social Studies (6-12)

    0 Class Hours 18 Laboratory Hours 12 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Provisional teaching license issued by State of Georgia, full-time employment teaching social studies (7-12).
    Student teaching experience in social studies for provisionally certified teachers. Supervision will be in collaboration with a mentor-teacher in a local school and a specialist in social studies education. Twelve (12) hours of this internship will automatically substitute for SSED 4475. Proof of professional liability insurance. Students are responsible for their own school placements.

     


Honors

  
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    HON 2290 - Honors Seminar

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the undergraduate Honors program.
    A special topics course offered exclusively for students admitted to the Undergraduate Honors Program and designed to examine a single theme or issue from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, providing students with the opportunity to work individually or collaboratively on a cross-disciplinary project.

  
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    HON 3000 - Honors Colloquium

    1 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 1 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the undergraduate Honors program.
    A course designed to explore different disciplinary perspectives on knowledge and its acquisition, fostering faculty-student interchange in a seminar setting. Students also participate in three or more cultural/intellectual activities beyond the classroom. Required of all students in the Undergraduate Honors Program, the Colloquium may be repeated to meet the expectations of Fundamental Three of the Honors curriculum.

  
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    HON 3100 - Honors Interdisciplinary Research Methods

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 and admission to the undergraduate Honors program.
    Students learn about conducting research from an interdisciplinary perspective, with a focus on social science research strategies. The following topics are introduced: advantages and disadvantages of various research methods, designs of studies, methods of collecting and analyzing data, ethical issues involved in research, application of findings, and writing reports and proposals of an interdisciplinary nature. Students design a research project related to a topic of their choosing and write a research proposal similar to the proposal they will write for their Honors Senior Capstone Experience.

  
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    HON 4400 - Honors Directed Study

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the undergraduate Honors program.
    A course designed to accommodate traditional or applied learning experiences exclusive of those offered in other Honors courses.

  
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    HON 4490 - Honors Special Topics

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the undergraduate Honors program.
    A course addressing special topics of interest to Honors students and faculty.

  
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    HON 4497 - Honors Senior Capstone Experience I

    1 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 1 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Approval of the Honors program director.
    The Honors Senior Capstone Experience requires students to design and execute a project reflecting original research, an original synthesis of existing research, an application of existing research to a new context, an original creative work, or the application of special skills to the creation and coordination of a substantial service learning project in the student’s major. This first one-hour segment gives credit for producing a substantive honors capstone proposal that can be approved by the Honors Council. Required of all students in the Undergraduate Honors Program.

  
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    HON 4498 - Honors Senior Capstone Experience II

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HON 4497.
    This three-hour segment of the Honors Senior Capstone Experience requires a student with an approved capstone proposal to conduct research or complete other activities related to the capstone product and submit a research outline or detailed progress report to the project supervisor at the end of the semester. Required of all students in the Undergraduate Honors Program.

  
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    HON 4499 - Honors Senior Capstone Experience III

    1-3 (variable) Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HON 4498.
    This final segment of the Honors Senior Capstone Experience requires an honors student to complete and submit the Honors Portfolio and the final capstone product: an honors thesis, an original creative work, or a capstone narrative, supported with appropriate documentation, describing the process and learning outcomes of a major service learning project. Required of all honors students.


Human Services

  
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    HS 2233 - Overview of Human Services

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: None.
    This required course provides students with an overview of helping professions. Topics include: philosophy of human services; characteristics of human service workers; careers in human services; description of public, non-profit and for-profit agencies; theory; and cultural diversity. Human service majors are required to take this course prior to applying for admission into the HS program. This course is also a prerequisite for other HS courses. Students must complete 20 hours of volunteer service as a requirement of this class.

  
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    HS 2240 - Fundamentals of Nonprofit Organizations

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: None.
    This introductory course is designed to provide knowledge, theory, and skills in the administrative/management aspects of nonprofit organizations.

  
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    HS 2244 - Foundation Internship

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 2233 and HS 2260.
    This required course provides students the opportunity to begin to explore the helping professions by completing 150 hours of service learning while applying theoretical knowledge, skills and human services value systems. Specifically, HS majors will be expected to demonstrate knowledge content from Module I courses (HS 2233, HS 2240, HS 2250 and HS 2260). Students will be expected to demonstrate beginning competencies in micro and macro practice.  

    Notes: For accepted Human Service majors only.
  
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    HS 2250 - Cultural Competence in the Human Services

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: None.
    This foundation required course in human diversity enhances students’ abilities to understand, evaluate, and provide culturally sensitive and competent human services to members of diverse groups. This course gives students the opportunity to reflect upon their own cultural development and to be more sensitive to others.

  
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    HS 2260 - Interviewing Skills for the Helping Professions

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Completed 30 credit hours at KSU.
    This required course introduces students to interviewing skills in non-crisis settings. Communication skills learned in the course include relation-building techniques within a problem-solving model. Additionally, students learn skills to identify client strengths and to work with resistant clients. Students are required to role-play, videotape, and critique skills learned in the course. The goal of this course is to expose the student to a variety of perspectives and techniques used by all human service workers.

  
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    HS 2275 - Research Methods for Human Services

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: MATH 1107 or equivalent.
    This required course introduces quantitative and qualitative social science research methods with an emphasis on specific methods necessary for human service research and evaluation. This course enables students to become informed producers and consumers of research products, particularly in the human service areas. The emphasis is on basic concepts and underlying assumptions of various social science research methodologies and their design implications. It also develops skills in designing research projects with a particular emphasis on survey research. This course content has critical application in HS 4498- Capstone course.

    Notes: Offered as an online course.
  
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    HS 3200 - Social Welfare Policy

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: POLS 2212 or POLS 1101.
    This required course provides students with an overview of American social welfare policy and social problems that policies address. Value systems underpinning the social welfare policies are explored along with the relevance of NOHS Code of Ethics in shaping American Social Welfare policies. Attention is also given to social welfare in a global context.

  
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    HS 3300 - Human Socialization

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: SOCI 2201 or PSYC 1101.
    This required course provides students with an overview of human development within the social environment. This course focuses on the effect of the environment on personal and social functioning.

  
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    HS 3304 - Community Intervention

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 2233.
    This required course focuses on macro-human service practice as a complement to preparation in micro-direct services. It is specifically designed to provide students with a working knowledge and basic skills required for helping communities and organizations address their needs and concerns. Students will learn various models of community and organizational intervention that can be used in diverse settings.

  
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    HS 3320 - Working with Support Groups

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 2260 and HS 3300.
    This course introduces students to basic theory, skills, methods, and values necessary to lead support groups. Students will develop, facilitate/co-facilitate issue-oriented groups for different ages, genders, etc.

  
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    HS 3322 - Aging and the Family

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 2233 or PSYC 2201.
    This course introduces students to family systems theory and practice in relation to working with older adults and their families. The impact on nursing home placement, Alzheimer’s disease, death and dying, and depression as it is related to family function is stressed. Services and solutions to aging related problems will be included.

    Notes: Offered as an online course.
  
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    HS 3324 - Death, Dying, and Bereavement

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 2233 or PSYC 1101.
    In this course, students will examine death, dying, and bereavement from historical, contemporary, and cultural view points. Students will also study skills necessary for working with dying and bereaved populations.

  
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    HS 3335 - Working with Families

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 3320.
    This course provides students an overview of the basic theoretical models used for family interventions. Students will also apply family intervention skills within mock situations.

  
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    HS 3350 - Poverty and Culture

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 2250.
    This required course will provide an overview of poverty in the U.S., its causes, efforts to alleviate it, and its reflection in and by culture. Students will examine theories of causes of poverty, insights into personal experiences of poor people, and critical thinking activities relative to this social issue.

  
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    HS 3375 - Program Development and Evaluation

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 2275.
    This course introduces student to the development and evaluation of human services programs. Students will learn program evaluation techniques, utilizing course content from HS 2275. They will design a small-scale program that includes an evaluation plan.

  
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    HS 3398 - Advanced Internship

    3-9 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Permission of the department.
    Human service majors are required to complete a minimum of 300 clock hours (6 semester credit hours) of supervised field experience. The advanced internship is expected to be taken in the final semester before graduation. Students are assigned to sections based on their concentration.

    Notes: This course is for Human Services majors only.
  
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    HS 3520 - Leadership in Nonprofit Organizations

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 2240.
    This course introduces students to the field of leadership in nonprofit organizations. It specifically focuses on managing change, role of leadership organizations of the future, and the skills needed to successfully lead an organization. The “underpinning” of leadership (trust, credibility, courage, aloneness, reciprocity, sharing power, etc.) is also explored. This is a required course for Nonprofit Leadership Alliance students pursuing the Certification in Nonprofit Management.

  
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    HS 3540 - Grant Writing and Fundraising

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 2240.
    In this course students study fundraising/development, including grant-writing, special events, and basic finance in the nonprofit sector. It is appropriate for students working in all areas of Human Services as well as other majors who plan to work with nonprofits or governmental agencies.

  
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    HS 3560 - Human Resources for Nonprofit Organizations

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 2240.
    Students will examine theories and management practices necessary to effectively manage human resources for nonprofit organizations, including staff and volunteers.

  
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    HS 4400 - Directed Study in Human Services

    1-3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor and department chair.
    This course covers special topics and seminars external to regular course offerings. May include original research projects and practicum experiences.

  
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    HS 4410 - Ethics in the Helping Profession

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: 99 credit hours completed.
    This required course provides students with an understanding of the importance of ethics and values in the Human Service Profession. The course exposes students to different ethical decision making models and diverse value systems. Students will demonstrate skills in applying NOHS Code of Ethics to ethical dilemmas in Human Services and balance their personal values in the process. Ideally, this course should be taken concurrently with HS 3398 and HS 4498 in the student’s final semester.

    Notes: This course is for Human Services majors only.
  
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    HS 4415 - Principles of Child Welfare

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 2233 or PSYC 1101.
    This course provides the student with a comprehensive overview of child welfare as a societal concern. Students will become aware of the historical development of children’s problems, services, and the issues facing children today.

  
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    HS 4420 - Dynamics of Family Violence

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 2233 or PSYC 1101.
    This course provides students with a working knowledge of family violence issues. Students will become familiar with different theories regarding causation and treatment as well as society’s response to family violence.

  
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    HS 4425 - Working with Children and Youth

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 3300 or PSYC 3305.
    This course focuses on theoretical interventions through the lifespan phases of childhood and adolescence. Intervention techniques within an ecological framework are explored and assessed for use in a wide range of problem areas in a variety of settings.

  
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    HS 4430 - Forensic Social Work

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 3300 or permission of the department.
    This course provides an overview of the interplay between human service professionals and the court systems. It will also focus on forensic social work practice and theory. Additionally, it illustrates skills for working with diverse populations across the lifespan and across diverse settings, such as community, medical, school, child welfare, mental health and addictions, and juvenile and criminal justice settings.

  
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    HS 4440 - Crisis Intervention

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: HS 2260.
    This course builds on concepts and techniques taught in HS 3313 Interviewing Skills for Human Service Workers. Students will learn crisis intervention theory, advanced communication skills, and knowledge about different crises and crisis settings. Students will be required to role-play crisis intervention techniques.

  
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    HS 4450 - Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Child Advocacy

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in HS 4430.
    This  course is the first of two courses for the CAST certificate and may also be taken as an elective. The course covers the history, comparative perspectives, legal framework and responses to child maltreatment. It also discusses the skills necessary to work in the field and other pertinent issues pertaining to child maltreatment and child advocacy. The field of child maltreatment is fraught with controversy. Much of the class focuses on these controversies. The approach of the course will be from a variety of diverse, professional perspectives including the perspectives of a prosecuting attorney versus a defense attorney. The course is designed for students majoring in human services, criminal justice, education, social work, sociology, psychology, nursing, or other areas where knowledge of child maltreatment and advocating for children might be necessary. Much of the work will be hands-on.

  
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    HS 4460 - Professional and System Responses to Maltreatment

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in HS 4430.
    This course is the second of two courses for the CAST certificate but may be taken as an elective. The purpose of this course is to prepare students to identify and investigate child maltreatment and apply intervention strategies for children and their families including prosecution where indicated. The class will discuss issues related to child witnesses such as recantation, suggestibility, memory and the impact of multiple interviews on children. Role plays and case studies will be used in the course.

  
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    HS 4490 - Special Topics in Human Services

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor and department chair.
    This course provides selected topics of interest to faculty and students.

  
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    HS 4498 - Capstone Seminar in Human Services

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: 90+ credit hours.
    This required course is the culmination of the human services program, integrating students’ education and experiences. It is designed to provide students with the opportunity to synthesize and apply learning from their program of study in a comprehensive manner. This course is to recommended to be taken the final semester before graduation in conjunction with HS 3398 and HS 4410 (Module V).

    Notes: This course is for Human Services majors only.

Inclusive Education

  
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    INED 3304 - Education of Exceptional Students

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education program.
    Prepares candidates to work collaboratively with families and school personnel to have a positive impact on the educational, social and behavioral development of all students, including those with a full range of disabilities, in a diverse society. The course focuses on knowledge of legislative mandates for serving exceptional students, characteristics of exceptionality, best practice in facilitating teaching and learning, and accountability through assessment of outcomes. This course requires an observational experience in an assigned school placement. Verification of professional liability insurance is required prior to placement in the field experience. Fulfills Georgia HB 671 requirement.

    Notes: Offered as an online course.
  
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    INED 4000 - Service Learning in Special Education

    1-3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: 60 hours and permission of the instructor and department chair/program coordinator.
    A community activity which links learning to life by connecting meaningful community service activities with academic learning, personal growth, and civic responsibility. Activity will be designed with the instructor and approved by the chair/program coordinator.

  
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    INED 4430 - Applied Linguistics and English Language Literacy

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: EDUC 2120 and EDRD 3320, or approval of the department.
    This course is an introduction to linguistic systems and their acquisition as they occur in the language development of English (ELs) and other limited English proficient learners. There is a strong focus on cognitive and social processes of language acquisition, including how functional, cultural, and critical literacies are constructed and promoted. Students will explore relationships among the four language domains, their connections to language proficiency levels and development of academic vocabulary.

  
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    INED 4490 - Special Topics in Inclusive Education

    1-6 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and department chair.
    Selected special topics of interest to faculty and students.


Information Security and Assurance

  
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    ISA 3010 - Security Script Programming

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Requirement; Non-business Majors: Permission of the Coles College of Business.
    This course provides a study of secure programming and security scripting techniques. The course examines aspects of developing traditional computer software, applying additional controls and measures to prevent the development of vulnerable and exploitable code. The course then examines scripting techniques used in support of ongoing technical security functions.

  
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    ISA 3100 - Principles of Information Security

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Requirement; Non-business Majors: Permission of the Coles College of Business.
    An introduction to the various technical and administrative aspects of Information Security and Assurance. This course provides the foundation for understanding the key issues associated with protecting information assets, determining the levels of protection and response to security incidents, and designing a consistent, reasonable information security system, with appropriate intrusion detection and reporting features.

    Notes: Offered as an online course.
  
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    ISA 3200 - Network Security

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Requirement and a grade of “C” or better in ISA 3100; Non-business Majors: A grade of “C” or better in ISA 3100 and permission of the Coles College of Business.
    This course provides a detailed examination of tools, techniques, and technologies used in the protection of information assets. This course is designed to provide a solid foundation in data communications and networking fundamentals and the security of networks and networking technologies.

  
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    ISA 3210 - Client Systems Security

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Requirement; Non-business Majors: Permission of the Coles College of Business.
    This course is an exploration of client computer system security and vulnerabilities, including client computer architectures, and operating systems. It provides the detailed technical coverage necessary to protect computer information system clients by presenting the knowledge of client platform computer hardware components, client network devices and interfaces, as well as the structure and usage of common client operating system software from an information security perspective. Additional learning regarding ongoing maintenance and operational issues of client computing systems will also be included.

  
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    ISA 3300 - Management of Information Security in a Global Environment

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Requirement and a grade of “C” or better in ISA 3100; Non-business Majors: A grade of “C” or better in ISA 3100 and permission of the Coles College of Business.
    This course provides a detailed examination of the administration of the information security function beginning with the strategic planning process and including an examination of the policies, procedures, and staffing functions necessary to organize and administrate ongoing security functions in the organization. Subjects include security practices, security architecture security in light of international regulation, competition, and operating environments is emphasized througout the course.

    Notes: Offered as an online course.
  
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    ISA 3330 - Information Security Approach to Crisis Management

    3 Class Hours 0 Laboratory Hours 3 Credit Hours
    Prerequisite: Business Majors: Sophomore GPA Requirement. This course may not be sued toward the ISA major; Non-business Majors: Permission of the Coles College of Business and completion of 60 semester hours.
    This course is an interdisciplinary examination of detailed aspects of contingency planning and crisis management. It includes disaster recovery planning, business continuity planning, and a complete and detailed treatment of crisis management. Students will learn to develop and execute plans for implementing contingency operations when critical functions are disrupted.

 

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